How winning awards can transform your business

We were delighted to have our members R A Brown Heating Services speak at a recent meeting about how awards had transformed their business.

Louise came along to show us their impressive collection of awards and talk about the impact it had made on their business, sharing some valuable tips too.

R A Brown specialise in the design and installation of ground and air source heat pumps, and always knew they weren’t just a run of the mill heating engineer company.

A nomination was made in an industry award – which they won, and it had a huge snowball effect. Awards are now a firm part of their marketing strategy and Louise shared her top tips for winning awards…

You’ve got to be in it to win it

It’s an old saying but it’s true. Every year, c0-director Richard feels their work isn’t good enough to win. Yet time and time again he’s proved wrong. You have to look at your work positively and go for it.

Blow your own trumpet!

Many of us find this difficult, but it’s important, so be proud of what you do. Applying for awards is inextricably linked with business development and keeping your competitive edge.

Passion wins awards

Louise says they now prefer the awards where you get the opportunity to speak to the judges following a written application. They’ve been told many times that their passion for their field shines through. Save something back to add extra information to the presentation – for R A Brown, that’s often an update on the performance of the heating system.

The David and Goliath complex

Don’t be afraid to pit yourself against much bigger companies. Awards are based on the quality of work or impact you’ve made, not on the number of employees. Often bigger companies hire a marketing agency to apply for awards for them, which means the passion is diluted.

Set targets

It might sound crazy, but it takes time to prepare award applications so schedule them into your diary and always think ahead. R A Brown try to win one or two awards each year, and Louise suggests setting your targets according to the time and resources you have available. Every sector has different awards, but don’t overlook general awards such as the EDP Business Awards.

Don’t be downhearted

If you get shortlisted but don’t win, use the awards night as an opportunity to network.


Worth a read: 8 Reasons to enter business awards, even if you don’t win


Pay attention to the questions

Award applications can be a bit like a lengthy job application. It’s important to answer the questions carefully rather than just trying to sell yourself and what you want to say.

Down to the nitty gritty

Firstly, keep an eye on trade/sector magazines who often run awards and local press for local business awards. Read through the categories and criteria carefully to make sure it’s a good fit and that you have a fairly unique offering. Keep asking yourself “what makes me/us different” as you complete the application.

If there’s the chance to supply supporting evidence, a powerpoint works well as you can add images and text as well as stats to demonstrate your business growth. And tie in award applications with your blog or case studies and obtain testimonials regularly – these are invaluable when it comes winning awards, and shows your customers blowing your trumpet too!

If you work completely on your own then use a community like Her Business Brew to get feedback on your draft award applications before submitting. And remember, you deserve a new dress for the awards ceremony and probably more than 1 glass of prosecco.

Plaster successes everywhere!

Customers are impressed by award-winning companies. If you win, put the award logos everywhere – on your website, social media, email signature, pop-up banners, brochures and flyers, in advertorial press, try for free press coverage if you can get it – make that award work hard for you!

 

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How winning awards can transform your business

Professional Photography Tips for Great Website Images

Hi, I am Jess a mother too two gorgeous children and lucky enough to own and run my own business as a newborn and family photographer.

I wanted to share some tips for improving your photographs, perfect if you are new to the self-employment world or if you need a few new images for your website to keep it fresh.

Here are my top tips to achieving good photos for your website…
Light is the most important factor

The word photography comes from the Greek language and means drawing with light. If you are shooting indoors its best to pick the time of day where it is not too dark. But also perhaps avoid midday where the light maybe too bright & blinding. Watch the time of day in the place you wish to shoot in, make a note of what time of day works best

Declutter

Look around the subject you wish to photograph, ensure there is nothing that distract the eye away from it

Backdrop

If you sell products it is worth investing in a backdrop that you can use over and over again, this makes it identifiable to you and your brand. it can be a paper roll from creativity or school supplies . A plain block colour like grey or white are great options – it should fit with your brand and styling though. Also look around you. Can you use a wall, or flooring? – think outside the box

Composing

Ensure what you are photographing is in frame clearly, crop in if needs be. If its a product take images from different angles this gives you an opportunity to show more detail

Size matters

When uploading images to your website check the settings for the optimal size they should be. You do not want people to be squinting nor do you want the page to take ages to load because of a giant sized image. (my website and images look best around 1800 × 1440)

Invest

When it comes to headshots I would highly recommend hiring a professional for this part, look for commercial photographers with good reputations. If this is not an option for a while, dress in clothes that represent you but are not distracting avoid patterns/spots choose simple colours (avoid white). Make sure you are not shooting up your nose, and easier said than done – keep relaxed. Try breathing out a deep breath just before smiling

If you have a baby related business in need of some photographs please get in touch. I offer discounts to businesses who cater for babies (Just quote SFPS)

Jess Wilkins Photography

About the author:

Jess is a newborn and family photographer based in Norwich. She captures beautiful images of babies & children, focusing on emotions and the little details. If you would like natural and timeless portraits of your bump, baby, toddler or family, visit her website, Facebook page, or email her on info@jesswilkinsphotography.co.uk to book in. 

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Ideal Clients: Why They are Important

Last week I ran a workshop at the University of East Anglia on ideal clients which covered what people mean by the term ‘ideal clients’, how you can identify yours, and how this can make an impact to your marketing.

Today I stepped in to talk at our Central Norfolk group after the other speaker couldn’t attend, so I took a small section of this workshop and talked about how you can categorise your ideal client, for example by age, gender, marital status, parental status, job income… even down to things like values.

People then drew their ‘ideal client’ and gave them a name.

Some people find this activity a little awkward, some don’t think there’s any point, and others totally embrace the challenge.

Now this is not about your ability to draw, stick-people are absolutely fine, it’s about identifying that one person you’d like to work with the most, the person who wants what you offer and can afford to pay for it, it’s about building knowledge.

The more you refine who your ideal client might be (and yes it’s fine to have several ideal clients in mind, especially so if you offer different products or services), the more you can get to know them. The more you can identify their needs, address their problems and find them to market to as well.

Getting to know your ideal clients allows you to use the language they use in your social media posts, email newsletters, adverts, on your website, flyers or packaging. To use colours or styles that you know resonate with them, and to promote what you do in the places they are. I mean there’s no point spending £2k on a radio ad campaign if your ideal clients don’t listen to the radio!

There are no hard and fast rules here, and things may change over time so it’s worth reviewing this every year or two, or as your business evolves.

Understanding your ideal clients inside out will help you better market to them, resulting in more sales, and will enable you to address their needs more fully, creating loyal customers who refer others your way too. Win win!

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Ideal Clients: Why They are Important